Book Reviews

March’s Book of the Month   Tools of Titans    By Tim Ferriss    Book Review by Dyson Panko   Tools of Titans is a collection of short profiles of some of the most well-known and successful people in the world; in these profile there are quick summaries of the Titans routines, tactics, philosophies, and habits.  Tools of Titans reads very much like a social media page; however your friends are world class athletes, billionaires, movie stars, former Special Forces, and more.  Before you hop into the book Tim Ferriss provides a preface titled “Read This First - How to Use this Book” which is a must read if you’re going to get the most out of the book (and enjoy it)  The over 650 pages of this book contains a plethora of information (some of it contradictory), it is however not a step by step guide of how to become a Titan yourself. It makes no difference if you start reading on Page 1 with Amelia Boone’s profile or page 303 with Alex Blumberg’s, each profile is self-contained and if there is supplementary information in ToT there are references to where in the book you can find it.  While reading this book make sure to have a note pad to mark down ideas you want to remember and people you want to hear more from. As many profiles you’ll read and think “Oh neat” or “Odd but interesting” there will be at least one (but probably multiple) with ideas that will be indispensable to you and will take you down a rabbit hole of research and life changing advice.  The book feels like you’re authentically hearing from these people, and as such there is a fair use of colorful language throughout. If you are sensitive to curse words be prepared if you choose to flip these pages and gather insights from a wide range of successful people.  If you’re interested in discovering new people and ideas this is a perfect book to start with.

March’s Book of the Month

Tools of Titans

By Tim Ferriss

Book Review by Dyson Panko

Tools of Titans is a collection of short profiles of some of the most well-known and successful people in the world; in these profile there are quick summaries of the Titans routines, tactics, philosophies, and habits.

Tools of Titans reads very much like a social media page; however your friends are world class athletes, billionaires, movie stars, former Special Forces, and more.

Before you hop into the book Tim Ferriss provides a preface titled “Read This First - How to Use this Book” which is a must read if you’re going to get the most out of the book (and enjoy it)

The over 650 pages of this book contains a plethora of information (some of it contradictory), it is however not a step by step guide of how to become a Titan yourself. It makes no difference if you start reading on Page 1 with Amelia Boone’s profile or page 303 with Alex Blumberg’s, each profile is self-contained and if there is supplementary information in ToT there are references to where in the book you can find it.

While reading this book make sure to have a note pad to mark down ideas you want to remember and people you want to hear more from. As many profiles you’ll read and think “Oh neat” or “Odd but interesting” there will be at least one (but probably multiple) with ideas that will be indispensable to you and will take you down a rabbit hole of research and life changing advice.

The book feels like you’re authentically hearing from these people, and as such there is a fair use of colorful language throughout. If you are sensitive to curse words be prepared if you choose to flip these pages and gather insights from a wide range of successful people.

If you’re interested in discovering new people and ideas this is a perfect book to start with.

               February's Book of the Month

               February's Book of the Month

The Five Languages of Apology

By Gary Chapman and Jennifer Thomas

Book Review by Demi Panko

The Five Languages of Apology walks through the different types of apologies that different individuals need to receive from people to forgive.

It is a very comprehensive book and includes various scenarios in which one would either need to apologize or to forgive.

While it may seem repetitive and overtly intuitive to some readers, this book could be an excellent tool for individuals that struggle with forgiveness and apologies.

Gary Chapman and Jennifer Thomas also use and find parallels between the five languages of apology and Gary Chapman’s previous theory/book: The Five Love Languages. This could be immensely helpful for people struggling in their personal relationships, such as a troubled marriage, as weaving the theory of the five languages of apology and the five love languages together can create a profound result wherein the other person would feel heard, respected, appreciated and if need be, in an emotional place where providing forgiveness would be possible where it was not before.

I would highly recommend reading The Five Love Languages prior to reading The Five Languages of Apology as the latter book references the principles covered in the first book rather frequently. In addition, the concepts are easier to grasp and implement if you have already read the first book and are already working towards the implementation of the five love languages.

This book is an easy read and would be a good book to provide to clients if you are in the field of working with people in conflict. I do believe that if people take the time to understand each other’s needs and work to satisfy those needs it can mean a world of difference in coming to a resolution to a conflict, especially in situations where an ongoing relationship will be necessary, for example, in the case of a separation and divorce where the former couple will need to implement a co-parenting arrangement.

The book also includes The Five Languages of Apology Personal Profile to help better understand your own apology needs.

I especially enjoyed the chapter on apologizing and forgiving oneself. I found it powerful and had never really considered that sometimes what is hampering us from growing in a healthy way has to do with wrongs we have committed against ourselves which we have never received forgiveness for.

I look forward to using these theories in practical application as well as seeing how these principles will help the clients we work with at our firm.

January's Book of the Month

January's Book of the Month

The Wealthy Barber By David Chilton Book Review

By Dominique Panko

            This everyman’s financial guide is written in the style of a narrative and in simple, easy to understand terms. Two young adult siblings learn that a barber in their hometown has made himself wealthy and, on their father’s recommendation, they decide to visit this barber. The barber is Roy Miller who agrees to give them some basic financial planning advice. The siblings, Cathy who is a successful entrepreneur and Dave (our narrator) who is a teacher and family man, invite their friend Tom, a generic single man, to joint them.

            The vast majority of the story happens in Roy’s barber shop with some peanut gallery style characters sitting around contributing small bits of information to the conversation while Roy gives advice. The story reads a bit like an educational video with each character “interrupting” each other in a fairly staged and predictable way to show how each bit of advice should be applied in different circumstances.

            Roy’s advice is easy to understand and does give a strong base for general individual and family financial planning. Roy advocates for small savings over a long period of time to make one wealthy eventually, not a magic quick fix to monetary disaster. The primary rules are to save 10% of all your income in a diverse portfolio, pay yourself first taking the 10% off the top of your pay-cheque, and rely on cost averaging and compound interest to build yourself a nest of funds so that to one day you can have the finer things in life.

            The book is broken up into sections which cover RRSPs, Real Estate, general investments, household budgeting, and some miscellaneous money management principles. Each grouping is written in plain language which could potentially be processed by anyone. The simple concepts are quite helpful for the average person and if followed could set up anyone for financial stability, regardless of annual income.

            The most important point in the book is the pay-yourself-first 10% of your income concept, which arguably should be adopted by everyone. Of course, you probably really won’t notice the first 10% coming out automatically, as stated repeatedly by every character throughout this novel style guide. While the story is a little thin and the characters are pretty predictable, it would be fair to suggest this read to anyone looking for some easy to follow financial planning tips.